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What do BIHS alumni say?

Over 2000 students have graduated from BIHS since the pioneering class of 2010.  Alumni are a valuable resource for feedback on our program as well as support to our current students. Your input informs our school design and instruction from the perspective of college, career and life readiness as students navigate university studies and the workplace after being with us. We also always have opportunities to give back to BIHS as guest speakers, mentors, CAS opportunity providers, and donors.

If you are a current BIHS alum and would like to connect with our program, please email Teacher Leaders Becky Villagran (rebeccavillagran@berkeley.net) or Karen Zapata (karenzapata@berkeley.net).

Be in touch alums!

Quotes from recent BIHS alums:

Ariel Gizzi, Tufts University

“BIHS prepared me really well for college. The classes I took as part of the IB Diploma program challenged me to think in new ways and made me sharpen both my time management habits and research skills. I loved my teachers and also enjoyed having a smaller community within Berkeley High.”

Talia Stringfellow, Class of 2015

The IB program allowed me to think in such a highly critical way that it’s been unbelievably helpful. I’m ahead of the game and much more articulate and analytical.

Sebastian Gallegos, Bates College

The strenuous amount of work throughout my years at BIHS has altered my sense of workload. With many assignment now in college, time management and efficiency have become almost second nature. Thanks to BIHS, I have the tools to succeed!

Lucia Page-Harley, UCLA

I graduated BIHS in 2014.  I often think back upon my time in IB as a helpful push into higher education. IB encourages critical thinking and promotes higher manners of thought. In my experience, even at a huge public school, college expects infinitely more than filling out scantrons and memorizing facts. The elevated reasoning that IB taught is considered a basic requirement here. If it hadn’t been for my time in ToK and other IB courses, I’d have come to college at a serious disadvantage.